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Intel chip features on new An Post Stamp

A number of years ago Irish Times journalist Fintan O’Toole created an original series namedA History of Ireland in 100 Objects. The series, which was published as a fully illustrated hardback book in 2013, features objects that each mark a transformational moment in the country’s history.

Hugh Hardiman, Director of Public Affairs at Intel Ireland, is pictured outside the GPO in Dublin to showcase one of An Post’s Ninth Definitive Stamp Series which features on it the Intel Pentium Processor.

More recently, these historical objects have been further celebrated as An Post launched its Ninth Definitive Stamp Series. The series is based on the 100 objects, featuring them on the everyday label stamps available at post offices nationwide.

Taking pride of place among extraordinary objects such as the Book of Kells, the Ardagh Chalice, a GAA medal from 1887, and a Titanic launch ticket, stands Intel’s Pentium Processor. In 1994, when Intel launched the Pentium Processor, a chip that was central to the emergence of the personal computer as an everyday consumer product, more than half of worldwide production was based at Leixlip, Co. Kildare.

The Intel Pentium Processor is a symbol of Ireland’s journey towards becoming a global leader in the technology sector. Intel’s innovations, such as the Pentium Processor, unlock limitless possibilities and revolutionise the way we experience the world. We are enormously proud to appear on a national stamp. It is a recognition of the incredible things that been made possible by our employees for over three decades now in Ireland. We develop products that change lives and histories.

The Intel processor stamp was included in Phase IV of the Ninth Definitive Stamp Series. The other items depicted in Phase IV are:

  • The Ballinderry Sword, a mid-ninth century Viking sword found in Ballinderry, Co. Westmeath in 1928 can be viewed at the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin.
  • The four-metre long Waterford Charter Roll, dating from 1215 to 1373, contains documents or transcripts relating to Waterford during that time and is on display at the Medieval Museum, Waterford Museum of in Waterford City.
  • The original 15th or 16th century Gallowglass Gravestone still sits in a graveyard in Clonca, Co Donegal where it was discovered while a replica cast is on display at the GAA Museum, Croke Park in Dublin.
  • Cut in Dublin in the 1790’s Robert Emmet’s Ring is on view at the National Museum of Ireland – Decorative Arts and History, in Dublin’s Collins Barracks.
  • In the 19th century the Cooking Pot became an essential household item throughout the country.  Originally from Corelish East, Co. Limerick, this particular Cooking Pot can be seen at the National Museum of Ireland – Country Life, Castlebar, Co. Mayo.
  • The 1911 Titanic Launch Ticket belonged to David Moneypenny who was a ship’s painter.  It can be viewed at the National Museums Northern Ireland — Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, Hollywood, Co. Down.
  • The Washing Machine, which can be viewed at the Irish Agricultural Museum, Co. Wexford, became widely available in the 1950’s after homes were connected to water and electricity.

 

To celebrate the release of the Intel processor as part of the Ninth Definitive Stamp series, each Intel employee in Ireland received a bespoke keepsake which was affixed with the special stamp.

To celebrate the release of the Intel processor as part of the Ninth Definitive Stamp series, each Intel employee in Ireland received a bespoke keepsake which was affixed with the special stamp.

 

More about the Intel microprocessor
Throughout Intel’s history, our innovations have enriched people’s lives and shaped the human experience.

In 1965, Gordon Moore developed Moore’s Law which predicted that transistors of the future would both increase in performance and decrease in cost at an exponential rate. To put this progression into perspective: the first semiconductor transistors were the size of an eraser at the end of a pencil. As a result of Moore’s law, more than sixty-four million of today’s tri-gate transistors could fit in the full stop at the end of this sentence.

Hugh Hardiman, Director of Public Affairs at Intel Ireland, is pictured outside the GPO in Dublin to showcase one of An Post’s Ninth Definitive Stamp Series which features on it the Intel Pentium Processor.

 

Additional information about Intel is available at:

Web – intel.ie |  Twitter – @Intel_IRL  |  Facebook – Intel Ireland

Media contact: Sarah Sexton |  sarah.sexton@intel.com  | + 353 1 606 8537 

About Intel

Intel (Nasdaq: INTC) is an industry leader, creating world-changing technology that enables global progress and enriches lives. Inspired by Moore’s Law, we continuously work to advance the design and manufacturing of semiconductors to help address our customers’ greatest challenges. By embedding intelligence in the cloud, network, edge and every kind of computing device, we unleash the potential of data to transform business and society for the better. To learn more about Intel’s innovations, go to newsroom.intel.com and intel.com.

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