Irish designed Intel Galileo Gen 2 Powers Dublin Maker

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

•    This weekend the Dublin Maker event took place in Trinity College Dublin with Intel for the first time becoming a main sponsor of the festival

•    The event included a special Intel Galileo hib at which Intel showcased the newly released Galileo Gen 2, the latest in a family of Arduino*-certified development boards based on Intel® architecture and specifically designed for makers, students, educators, and DIY electronics enthusiasts

•    The Galileo Gen 2 is an enhancement of the original Galileo, released in October last year, and this new board, and the Intel® Quark SoC X1000 by which it is powered, both continue to be designed in Ireland by a team based at the at the Intel campus in Leixlip Co. Kildare

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DUBLIN MAKER, July 27 2014– Yesterday at the Dublin Maker event which took place in Trinity College Dublin, Intel showcased the newly released Galileo Gen 2, the latest in a family of Arduino*-certified development boards based on Intel® architecture and specifically designed for makers, students, educators, and DIY electronics enthusiasts. The Galileo Gen 2 is an enhancement of the original Galileo, released in October last year, and this new board, and the Intel® Quark SoC X1000 by which it is powered, both continue to be designed in Ireland by a team based at the at the Intel campus in Leixlip Co. Kildare.

Maker 1.jpgNyadhiel Ni Murchu aged 6 from Maynooth pictured at the Intel Galileo hub

At this weekend’s Dublin Maker event, Intel demonstrated the power of Intel® Galileo through a series of creative and diverse technology demos which were brought together in the specially penned ‘Galileo hub’. Visitors to the Maker gathering, an event which was open to the public and free to attend, had the opportunity to see how artists, designers and other do-it-yourself enthusiasts – who often don’t have technical backgrounds – have created interactive objects or environments using Galileo technology. It is through events such as Maker gatherings that Intel aims to encourage makers of all ages to explore the possibilities of creating with technology.

Details of the Galileo demos that were on display can be found as an accompanying attachment.


Intel Ireland for the first time this year became involved as a main sponsor of the Dublin Maker event which is a tented festival that takes the form of a “show and tell” experience where inventors/makers sourced through an open call have an opportunity to showcase their creations at individual booths in a carnival atmosphere.


Makers participating at the event range from tech enthusiasts to crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, artists, science clubs, students, authors, and commercial exhibitors. They are of all ages and backgrounds, coming from all over Ireland and beyond.

This year Dublin Maker took place as part of the Festival of Curiosity, Dublin’s outstanding Science festival.

Intel® Galileo Development Board: What Will You Make?

Intel Galileo is the first in a line of Arduino-compatible development boards based on Intel architecture and is designed for the maker and education communities. The platform is easy to use for new designers and for those looking to take designs to the next level.

Intel Galileo combines the performance of Intel technology and the ease of the Arduino software development environment. The development board runs an open source Linux operating system with the Arduino software libraries, enabling scalability and re-use of existing software, called “sketches”. Intel Galileo can be programmed through Mac OS*, Microsoft Windows* and Linux host operating software. The board is also designed to be hardware and software compatible with the Arduino shield ecosystem.

Intel Galileo is a great tool for quickly prototyping simple interactive designs such as LED light displays that respond to social media or for tackling more complex projects, from automating home appliances to building life-size robots controlled by a smartphone.

The Galileo Gen 2 includes a number of enhancements to the Intel Galileo board based on feedback from the active Galileo user community, including improved GPIO performance, more precise PWM signaling for better motor control, and a variety of new I/O interfaces for easier connections to a wide range of shields and peripheral hardware. For users looking to expand its capabilities even further, the Intel Galileo Gen 2 board is now Power-over-Ethernet ready.


Intel Galileo features the Intel® Quark SoC X1000, the first product from the Intel® Quark technology family of low-power, small-core products. Intel® Quark technology will extend Intel architecture into rapidly growing areas – from the Internet of Things to wearable computing in the future. Designed in Ireland, the Quark SoC X1000 is a 32-bit, single core, single-thread, Pentium® instruction set architecture (ISA)-compatible CPU, operating at speeds up to 400MHz.


Galileo Gen 2: Designed in Ireland

The new Galileo Gen 2 board and the Intel® Quark SoC X1000 by which it is powered both continue to be designed in Ireland at the Intel campus in Leixlip, Co. Kildare. The design team is led by Philip Moynagh and Noel Murphy who have guided the project over the last 3 years from a mere idea to the very innovative piece of technology which is available today. Since the Quark chip and Galileo board were first released last year, the Leixlip based design team has continued to grow from the initial group of 70 and is continuing to hire people into new roles on an ongoing basis. The team works to identify transformation opportunities, translate them into silicon and software architectures and build real world solutions. The project which has yielded these pivotal successes has been supported since its inception by the Industrial Development Agency (IDA) in Ireland.

In speaking about the continued success of the Irish design team Eamonn Sinnott, Intel Ireland General Manager said “When the Intel Galileo development board and the Quark SoC X1000 which it features were first introduced last October it truly represented a great day for Intel Ireland as both of those new technologies had been designed right here in Kildare. With the introduction of the Galileo Gen 2 we have continued to see the Irish team play a leading design role and this is a testament to the hard work, collaboration, and unwavering vision of the people involved. The development of a design competency for Intel in Ireland is something which we are very proud of and we are excited that people based right here in Ireland have the opportunity to work on a host of low power devices in wearable technology and the internet of things”.

Barry O’Leary, CEO at IDA Ireland also remarked on the continuing significance of this deisgn competency for Ireland, adding: “This is the first Intel product developed, from inception, here in Ireland. The development of this new world-leading technology here at Intel’s Leixlip plant is testament to the expertise and skills levels that Intel have built in Co.Kildare. This new chip has been designed in Ireland and sold across the world – a “designed in Ireland”  trademark will be printed on each product. The development of this chip here in Ireland shows that we can compete with any location in the world when it comes to developing and manufacturing leading technology. This design project represents a significant coup for Ireland. This project puts Ireland in the list of top countries in the world for chip design.”

Irish universities and Intel Galileo

When the Intel Galileo was first launched last October, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich announced a large-scale donation of 50,000 Intel® Galileo boards to 1,000 universities within next 18 months.

22 different Irish institutions have since engaged in this initiative receiving more than 700 boards to date. In addition, Intel identified 17 universities across six continents to develop curriculum based on the new Intel Galileo board. Among these first 17 universities to be selected to work on Galileo curriculum were Trinity College Dublin and University College, Cork. The goal of the education effort is to put the power of Intel technology into the hands of as many educators and students as possible.


The new Intel® Galileo Gen 2 is now available – visit http://maker.intel.com www.intel.com/support/go/galileo for information on where to buy and to learn more about Intel® Galileo.

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Emily Quinn aged 4 from Kildare playing with a Emutex Smart Home demo powered by Intel Galileo

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Nyadhiel, Riobard and Acol Ni Murchu from Maynooth pictured at Dublin Maker

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Lia Donaghue aged 6 from Balrothery pictured at the Dublin Maker

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Kate O’Donovan aged 16 from Clonakilty in Co.Cork pictured at the Intel Galileo hub at this year’s Dublin Maker

Further images from the event can be found here: Dublin Maker – an album on Flickr



Further Information


Related Links:


About Dublin Maker

Dublin Maker is a tented festival space on the grounds of Trinity College Dublin. It is a free to attend, family friendly and community driven event. Dublin Maker takes the form of a “show and tell” experience where inventors/makers sourced through an open call, have an opportunity to showcase their creations at individual booths in a carnival atmosphere. It’s a place where people show what they are making, and share what they are learning.


The festival event itself is a culmination of ‘hack, craft and make’ activities, which begin with the launch of the open call in March 2014 and build up throughout the year until the main festival event in July 2014. For more information visit www.dublinmaker.ie.


About Intel

Intel is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices.

Additional information about Intel is available at:

Web – intel.ie |  Twitter – @Intel_IRL  |  Facebook – Intel Ireland


Media contact: Sarah Sexton sarah.sexton@intel.com  | + 353 1 606 8537


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About Intel

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